Creamy Goat Cheese Pasta with Sun-dried Tomatoes

Having spent pretty much my entire life in the world of education either as the daughter of a teacher, a student, or a teacher myself, August has always meant one thing–back to school. I know that lots of folks in other parts of the country don’t start back until September {or, you know, February if you’re in NZ}, but in Georgia, we go back in August.

Maybe y’all that go back in September have the right idea though. August is still summer! The weather is still beautiful and there are lots of beautiful summery fruits and veggies in season and just asking to be carefully crafted into the most perfect summer dinner.

But once we go back to school… there just isn’t time! Especially in those first couple of weeks. The trick, I’ve found, is to have a few super quick weeknight meals up your sleeve that you can make on auto pilot. So for all my teacher friends who are back in school here is one of those recipes. It’s a super quick and healthy alternative to eating out multiple nights a week and, let’s face it, much cheaper. If the carnivore in your house really needs some meat, you can always stir in some shredded rotisserie chicken.

Are you back in school yet? What are some of your go-to week night meals? Some of our other favorite quickies are the cashew chicken noodles, Greek couscous with zucchini, and of course, my summer favorite.

Kiwi+Peach: Creamy Goat Cheese Pasta with Sun-dried Tomatoes

Creamy Goat Cheese Pasta with Sun-dried Tomatoes

{adapted for two from Martha Stewart}

The Pasta
6 oz whole wheat rigatoni {or some other kind of tube pasta}
1/2 cup sun-dried tomatoes, sliced
pinch of salt

The Sauce
2 tsp. olive oil
2 Tbsp. pine nuts {or sliced almonds}
1 clove of garlic, minced
1/4 tsp. red pepper flakes
1 cup white wine
3 ounces goat cheese, crumbled {plus a bit more for the top}
8 or so fresh basil leaves
fresh ground black pepper

To get started prepping, heat a large pot on medium high heat and boil your jug. Slice your sun-dried tomatoes into thin strips.

Pour the boiled water into your pot and when it has returned to a boil, add the pasta, sun-dried tomatoes, and salt. Cook the pasta, stirring occasionally, according to the package directions {usually 8-10 minutes for the tube pasta}. When its finished, drain the water then return the pot to the heat. {Just leave the pasta and sun-dried tomatoes in the strainer for a minute. We’ll get back to that in a quick minute.}

Drizzle the olive oil in the pot and then add your minced garlic, pine nuts, and red pepper flakes. Mix well and stir continuously until the pine nuts have toasted a bit. Add the wine and let it cook until the wine has reduced by half. Grab your pasta and sun-dried tomatoes and pop it back to the pot. Add the goat cheese and basil then stir very well.

Plate up and then sprinkle with crumbled goat cheese, a few grinds of black pepper, and a couple basil leaves.

Tuscan Salad with Homemade Roasted Garlic Croutons

Happy Friday friends! Sorry for the blog silence yesterday. It was a holiday here in Bavaria {these wonderful Catholics seem to have a holiday for everything!} and, while it was not my intention to take the day off, sometimes spending quality time with the Kiwi just trumps.

During our day off yesterday, I started reading Inferno. While the Kiwi has some strange hatred for Dan Brown books {despite having never picked up a singe one}, I quite like them, so I’m pretty excited to read this new one. I knew it was set in Florence, but man, its like I’m there again, except for the whole being on the run from an assassin. {That’s not a spoiler it’s on like page 2. Plus what else is Robert Langdon going to be doing? Sightseeing?} Really though, its making me miss Florence, Italian food, and wine. Mostly the wine…and the truffles.

Obviously this Tuscan salad was happening. I was inspired by a recipe one of my absolute favorite bloggers {seriously, Emily’s blog was what introduced me to this wonderful world of blogging} posted a long time ago.  We tweaked it a bit based on what we had on hand and some of the salads we had in Florence, but either way it is a phenomenal salad.

Kiwi+Peach: Tuscan Salad with Homemade Roasted Garlic Croutons

Tuscan Salad with Homemade Roasted Garlic Croutons

{inspired by Emily from Jones Design Company}

The Prep
10-12 cherry tomatoes
1 Tbsp olive oil
1 sprig of fresh rosemary
salt and pepper
1 bulb of garlic
1 Tbsp olive oil

The Salad
150-200 grams {2 cups or so} of mixed greens, washed
8-10 fresh basil leaves, sliced
10 fresh black olives, pitted
1/2 cup pecorino cheese, crumbled
1/4 of a small red onion, sliced

The Croutons
4 thick slices of ciabatta bread
2 Tbsp olive oil
2 cloves of roasted garlic, pureed
1/4 cup pine nuts

The Dressing
2 Tbsp. red wine vinegar
1 tsp. spicy dijon mustard
1/4 of a small red onion
1 clove of roasted garlic
3-4 leaves of fresh oregano
salt and pepper
1/4 cup of olive oil

First thing we have to do is put the tomatoes and the garlic on to roast. Preheat the oven to 300°F/150°C. For the roasted tomatoes, slice the tomatoes in half and in a large mixing bowl combine with olive oil, chopped rosemary, salt, and pepper. Mix well and then put them on a lined baking tray.  For the roasted garlic, cut the garlic bulb straight across on the stem end. Set it root side down on a piece of tin foil and pour the olive over the top. Wrap it up in  the tin foil and place on the tray with the tomatoes. Pop them in the oven for an hour.

Go chill out for 45 minutes. Read Inferno, or I guess you could be productive. Anyway…

About 15 minutes before the tomatoes and garlic are finished, come on back to the kitchen and combine all of the salad ingredients in that large bowl you were using before. Also, go ahead and slice your ciabatta bread and brush on the olive oil.

When the tomatoes and garlic are finished take them out and put the oven on broil {or grill for y’all Kiwis}. Toss the roasted tomatoes in with your salad mix.

Pop out 2 cloves from the garlic bulb and puree them in the food processor. Then spread the puree on your ciabatta bread. Place the slices on the baking sheet along with your pine nuts and put it in the oven for about 5 minutes. Keep an eye on the pine nuts. You just want them to be a bit toasted, not charred. If they are toasted before the bread, just take them out, add it to the salad mix, and put the bread back in the oven.

While the bread is a toasting, let’s make that dressing. Put all of your dressing ingredients in the food processor and pulse until you’re happy with the consistency.

When the bread is toasted, take it out, chop into bite sized cubes, and add it to your salad mix. Pour the dressing over to whole thing and toss well.

Kiwi+Peach: Tuscan Salad with Homemade Roasted Garlic Croutons

BBQ Chicken and Caramelized Onion Sandwich

I have really terrible luck when it comes to restaurants I like staying in business. My hometown gets a great brunch place next to a farmers market. Closed. One of my favorite beach restaurants opens a branch in Athens, and I can get sweet potato fries with blue cheese dipping sauce whenever I want. Nope, closed. Find a brunch place with the best chicken salad ever. Closed. When I moved to Munich there was this delicious, farm-to-table place that I absolutely loved. Closed. A unique, quirky coffee shop where my friends would have our coffee dates with the friendliest barista in town. Closed. We finally locate a place that does spicy {and reasonably priced} takeaway mexican food. Closed.

I think I’m jinxed.

So it’s with a lot of fear that I mention this next place to you. There would be real tears if this place closed. I just don’t think I could handle it. This place called Transmetropolitan. Now, this isn’t new news to anyone who has ever been to Athens {Georgia, not Greece}, but Transmet is the place to go for a delicious, substantial, and cheap slice of pizza. Seriously, you can get a slice of sicilian bigger than my face for like 2 bucks. College kids can’t beat it. My staple, during the college years, was the Johnny Hector’s BBQ Pizza. It had these amazing caramelized onions and a sweet and spicy BBQ sauce that really set it apart from other BBQ pizzas I’ve had in my day. So. Good. Y’all.

If you’re ever in Athens, please promise me you’ll check them out. Pretty please. You don’t want to see the tears.

So what’s a girl to do when she’s half way around the world and craving a Johnny Hector? Obviously we are going to make our own.

Kiwi+Peach: BBQ Chicken and Caramelized Onion Sandwich

BBQ Chicken Sandwich

The Onions
½ red onion
2 tsp butter
1 tsp brown sugar

The Chicken
1 chicken breast
pinch of salt and pepper
1 tsp olive oil
2 Tbsp bbq sauce

The Assembly
2 buns
2 Tbsp bbq sauce
1/4 cup cheese {gouda is good} or 1/2 ball of buffalo mozzarella

Start heating a pan on medium high heat. Slice your onion and when the pan is hot, drop the butter in the pan, add the onions, and then sprinkle with brown sugar. Give it a stir and cook for 10 minutes or until they are caramelized to your liking. When they are finished, put them in a small bowl and set them to the side.

While the onions are a caramelizing, slice your chicken breast into strips and sprinkle a bit of salt and pepper over the strips. Once the pan is free, add the olive oil and chicken to the pan. Seal the chicken on one side and then let it cook on the other side, undisturbed for about 3 or 4 minutes and then flip. After a few more minutes, pour the bbq sauce over the chicken and give it a stir until the pieces are completely covered. Let it cook until all the bbq sauce has been reduced then remove from the heat.

While the chicken is cooking, grate your cheese {or slice your mozzarella} and your buns. Spread bbq sauce on each side of the bun. When the chicken is finished, load the bottom halves of the sandwiches with the chicken, onions, and grated cheese. Pop them in the oven on broil {or grill for y’all Kiwis} until the cheese melts {3-5 minutes depending on your oven}.

Put the top on and get messy!

Quinoa Stir Fry

My first experience with quinoa was back in college in one of my food science labs. My teacher presented its as this wonder food that was a grain AND a complete protein {meaning that it contains all 9 essential amino acids which are usually only available in animal products}. We then proceeded to make one of the most delicious casseroles I’ve ever had with it, so naturally I was hooked.

But quinoa really is the wonder grain now. I can understand why its been a fave for vegans, but I’m loving that all us omnivores have jumped on the bandwagon too. In theory, and for a while there it did make it easier to get. A few weeks ago I posted an article about the economics of quinoa, and I understand that it’s not always an easy or cheap grain alternative. We are so lucky that a 500g bag is still just 5 euro here which, compared to a lot of places is a steal.

If quinoa is scarce in your area right now, then go ahead and try it with some brown rice. However, I would throw in a chicken breast or and extra egg just to get that extra protein!

Kiwi+Peach: Quinoa Stir Fry

Quinoa Stir Fry

{adapted for two from DamnDelicious}

The Quinoa
1/2 cup quinoa
1 cup water
1 tsp salt

The Egg
olive oil
1 egg
1 green onion {optional}

The Veg
olive oil
1 clove of garlic
1 small white onion {or 1/2 of a large one}
1 cup fresh mushrooms
2 cups of broccoli {or 1/2 a head}
1/2 of a zucchini
1 ear of corn, cooked

The Juice
1 Tbsp soy sauce
2 tsp. ginger

Start heating a medium sized pot and a large pan with deep sides on medium high heat. Go ahead an boil your jug. In a sieve, rinse your quinoa under hot water for a couple of minutes to rinse off the powdery saponin on the grain that has a really bitter taste. Very important step!

Once the jug has boiled, measure your water and add it to the pot along with the salt. Once it comes to a boil, add the quinoa and reduce the temperature to medium low. Cook for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally, or until the water is absorbed and the quinoa is soft.

While the quinoa is cooking away, pour a bit of olive oil in the pan {just enough for the egg not to stick} and add the egg. Scramble and cook until done then put it in a bowl and set to the side. Return the pan to the heat. {If you have a green onion, slice it up and scramble it in with the egg.}

Now get to chopping. This is all about timing. Mince your garlic and onion first. Then get to work on the mushrooms, broccoli, and zucchini. Wash the mushrooms, remove their stems, and then slice ’em up. Cut the florets off the head of broccoli and give them a rinse. Wash your zucchini, slice into half inch-ish sized slices, and then quarter those slices. Cut the kernels of corn off the ear and break them up into individual kernels.

Add the olive oil to the hot pan and toss in the minced garlic and onions. Cook for about 3-4 minutes.

Toss in the mushrooms, broccoli, zucchini, and corn and cook until the broccoli and zucchini are soft enough for your liking. {Usually 5-7 minutes for us.}

The quinoa should be finishing up by now, so use a fork to fluff it up a bit and remove it from the heat.

When your veggies are appropriately soft, add the quinoa to the pan. {I push all the veggies to the side, add a little bit more olive oil to the empty part of the pan and then add the quinoa a little at a time so that the quinoa can get a little bit crispy.} Go ahead and throw that scrambled egg back in there too and mix well.

Season with a little soy sauce and ginger and cook for a couple more minutes. Serve it up and enjoy. I always use a little sriracha sauce on mine for an extra little kick, but it’s just as delicious without.

The Caprese

Yesterday, around lunch time, I realized we had no bread and then I commenced with the panicking. Most of y’all in the States are thinking ‘So what? Go to the store you lazy bum.’ Not so fast my friends. Three words that really make you pay for any lapse in meal planning preparedness. Sunday. Shopping. Hours. As in, there are none. Grocery stores, retail stores, some restaurants. All closed. Coming from the land of 24 everything, it’s not my favorite thing about living in Germany. I mean, I understand the wonderful things it means about their society {kudos Deutschland} but sometimes I just really need some bread on Sunday.

So what is a girl to do? Naturally I scoured Pinterest for a quick bread recipe because the Kiwi was getting kind of hungry. I found this quick focaccia recipe and immediately started remembering all of the amazing focaccia with olive oil and balsamic we had in Italy. I was sold. You can’t really go wrong with olive oil and balsamic on fresh focaccia bread that is still warm. You know what else goes really well with that? Tomatoes, buffalo mozzarella, and fresh basil from the garden.

Again, kind of like the fried egg and tomatoes, this isn’t as much a recipe as just a simple sandwich you an throw together in no time flat. {That is of course unless you’re making the focaccia too in which case it’s going to take about an hour.} In the end we were pretty pleased with our meal planning fail.

Kiwi+Peach: The Caprese

The Caprese

2 large slices of focaccia bread {or half a loaf of your own}
1 Tbsp olive oil
2 smallish tomatoes {or 1 large one}
1/2 of a ball of buffalo mozzarella
5-6 leaves of fresh basil
1-2 Tbsp balsamic vinegar {depending on your taste}

Slice the focaccia and pour the olive oil over the bottom slice. Then slice your tomatoes, mozzarella, and basil. Layer the tomatoes and mozzarella until the bread is covered and then sprinkle on the basil. Pour the balsamic over the top and close her up.


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Voting ends tomorrow!

TheKitchn Small Cool Kitchen 2013: Lauren's Tiny Yet Airy Kitchen

Fried Egg with Tomatoes, Feta, and Avocado

In keeping with our breakfast items for dinner theme this week, I thought I’d share one of my go-to last minute dinners. This isn’t really a recipe to write home about. It’s just a bunch of delicious things piled on a plate and called a meal; however, the simplicity of it really lets you taste all of the flavors and they are beautiful together!

If you follow us on instagram you already know this, but we have a tomato!! That my friends is something to write home about. We grew that! From a seed! {Please note that this is the first thing I’ve ever grown in the history of ever, so please pardon my over-enthusiasm for our tiny little tomato baby. This is a big day.} I can’t wait for the rest of them to really come in so I can try this recipe with fried green tomatoes!

Fried Egg with Tomato, Feta, and Avocado

Fried Egg with Tomatoes, Feta, and Avocado

olive oil
4 eggs
2 smallish tomatoes
1/4 cup feta, crumbled
1/2 of an avocado
4 fresh basil leaves
fresh ground black pepper

Start heating a pan on medium high heat. While its heating up, I go ahead and slice the tomatoes and place the slices on our plates. I also crumble the feta, slice the avocado, and slice the basil into strips.

Once the pan is hot, add a bit of oil to the pan {just so the egg doesn’t stick}. Crack an egg into the pan and let it sizzle away for about 3 or 4 minutes. Then, very carefully, flip it and let it cook for 1 or 2 more minutes depending on how runny you like your egg. When its finished, transfer to a plate and repeat for the remaining eggs.

Once all the eggs are cooked and in place, top with the avocado, feta, basil, and black pepper and enjoy!


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TheKitchn Small Cool Kitchen 2013: Lauren's Tiny Yet Airy Kitchen

Creole Shrimp and Basil Goat Cheese Grits from Tupelo Honey Café

Thank y’all so, so much for your overwhelming support and kind words yesterday about our kitchen! Obviously a lot of cooking gets done in that kitchen, but like I said on the write up, my absolute favorite thing to cook is shrimp and grits.

On our last trip back to the States, I actually bought two 5 pound bags of grits. The Kiwi thought I was being absurd {which I kind of was}, but I was bound and determined to get back to Germany with enough grits to get me through. Unfortunately, we were over the weight limit on the bag so one of my bags of grits had to go. {It went back home with my mom. Don’t worry, no grits were harmed in the making of this error in judgement.} We have made do with just the one bag, but we do have to ration them. Its always a treat when we break out the grits.

Grits are inherently southern. Go north of the Mason-Dixon or west of the Mississippi and chances are most folks haven’t heard of them. It’s always hilarious to watch non-southerners in the breakfast line at southern hotels. They always scoop them up and let them drop with the most bewildered expression on their faces. Grits, much like polenta, is a ground corn product. It cooks up into a thick porridge-like consistency and {when paired with enough butter, cream, and cheese} are incredibly tasty. To learn more than you ever wanted to know about grits, check out the wiki.

I hesitate to say this because it may come across as bragging, but I’m something of a shrimp and grits connoisseur. By that I mean, if shrimp and grits are on the menu that’s what I’m ordering. As you can imagine, I’ve tried a lot of shrimp and grits. Every restaurant has their own take on the southern staple. Most are good, a few disgusting, but the following are truly, truly outstanding.

Grits A YaYa from Great Southern Café in Seaside, FL

Shellfish {shrimp, scallops, and lobster} over Grits from Magnolias in Charleston, SC

Shrimp {with andouille sausage} and {Vidalia onion} Grits from NONA {originally Harry Bissett’s} in Athens, GA

Shrimp and Grits from Alligator Soul in Savannah, Georgia

and my all time favorite…

Brian’s Shrimp Grits from Tupelo Honey Café in Asheville, North Carolina

Kiwi+Peach: Creole Shrimp and Basil Goat Cheese Grits from Tupelo Honey Café

Creole Shrimp and Basil Goat Cheese Grits

{adapted for two from the Tupelo Honey Cafe cookbook}

The Spice
2 tsp sugar
1 tsp salt
2 tsp paprika
1 tsp cayenne pepper
1 tsp fresh ground black pepper

The Shrimp
1 Tbsp olive oil
1 small clove of garlic
150 grams of shrimp, shelled
1/4 cup roasted red pepper, sliced
2 Tbsp of a dry white wine
1 1/2 Tbsp butter

The Grits
1 1/2 cups water
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 cup quick cooking grits {If they’re good enough for Tupelo Honey, they’re good enough for me.}
1 Tbsp butter
1 Tbsp soy cream
3 ounces of goat cheese
about 15 fresh basil leaves

Number one key to success in making this is preparation. The actual cooking time is so fast that you really won’t have time to prep ingredients while the others are cooking {my usual m/o}. That said…

Boil your jug and start heating up a medium pot and a large pan on medium high heat.

While they are getting hot, mix up the spice and set it to the side. Shell the shrimp, peel the garlic, thinly slice the roasted red pepper, and measure your butter. Most importantly, open your bottle of wine. You do not have time for wrestling with a cork once the shrimp is on. {Ain’t nobody got time for that!} As far as wine goes, I use a Gewürztraminer because that’s what the cookbook recommends you pair the dish with, and I’m not going to buy two different bottles of wine for one dish. It works well.

To prep for the grits, cut the rind off the goat cheese and crumble it; pick your basil leaves, wash them, and slice them; and measure your pat of butter.

Kiwi+Peach: Creole Shrimp and Basil Goat Cheese Grits from Tupelo Honey Café

The next few steps are an exercise in orchestration. Ready to multi-task?

By now the pot and pan should be nice and hot. Go ahead and add the olive oil to the pan to get it hot too.

Measure your {boiled} water from the jug and add it to the pot along with the salt.

Back at the pan, add your minced garlic and shrimp and give it a stir. Let it cook for 3-4 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Over in the pot, the water should be boiling now, so add your grits and butter. Stir constantly to avoid clumps as the grits absorb the water and the butter melts. Add the cream and reduce the heat to low.

Back at the pan, add the spice and stir well. Then add the red peppers and give it another stir. Let this cook for a couple minutes so the peppers can heat up and then add the wine.

Over in the pot, turn the heat off. Add your crumbled cheese and basil and stir until all the cheese is melted.

Back at the pan, remove the pan from the heat and add the butter. Stir until the butter melts completely.

Plate it up and enjoy!

Linking with Belinda and Bonnie for Travel Tuesday.

{This post contains an Amazon affiliate link. That means that if you head over to Amazon from the link and choose to buy the book, a tiny bit of the money you spent on the book will come back to me for the referral.} 


 •• Update ••

Apparently I should have consulted the Kiwi before I hit publish yesterday because he had a lot to add! Before he moved to Germany, he was living in North Carolina, and he has tried his fair share of shrimp and grits as well. Here are his recommendations.

Shrimp {with bacon and mushrooms} and {smoked cheddar} Grits from NOLA in New Orleans, LA

Carolina’s Shrimp and Grits from Carolina’s in Charleston, SC

He would also like to add that Gewürztraminer is a great wine to pair with spicy dishes in general {in fact, Gewürz means ‘spice’ in German}, which is what makes it the ideal choice for the Creole Shrimp and Grits.


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TheKitchn Small Cool Kitchen 2013: Lauren's Tiny Yet Airy Kitchen

Watermelon, Mint, and Feta Salad

It. is. so. hot.

I’ve started writing this post 5 times today and had to stop to go stick my head in the fridge. {TMI?} Come on, you know you do it too when it’s 50 million degrees outside. It’s days like this I miss air conditioning the most.

Our apartment is on the top floor of our building and we have huge windows in each room and the ceiling in the hall is a sky light. Please don’t get me wrong. I love, love, love all of our windows, but it’s a little like living in a green house and right now, that blows. Or rather doesn’t. Naturally we have all of the windows and doors open to create a cross-breeze which would significantly cool things down if the wind was blowing–which it’s not.

So I’ve resorted to sticking my head in the fridge and wishing it was big enough crawl inside. And while I’m there I might as well eat some watermelon, yes? And now that I’m thinking about watermelon I’m reminded that we have a lot of it. And since there is no way on God’s green earth I’m firing up that stove tonight, so I should probably figure out a salad.

Melon+mint is always a winner, right? Yes. Yes, it is.

Watermelon, Feta, and Mint Salad from Kiwi and Peach

Watermelon, Mint, and Feta Salad

The Salad Fixings
100 grams of mixed field greens
3-4 mint leaves
1/4 cup roasted pumpkin seeds {or sunflower, or flax, or etc.}
1/3 cup feta cheese, crumbled
1-2 cups watermelon, cubed {It’s kind of hard to actually measure. I used about 10 pieces on each salad.}

The Dress
{adapted from Tupelo Honey}
1/4 of a sweet onion, sliced
1 clove of garlic
juice from 1/2 of a lemon {about 1 Tbsp.}
2 tsp white wine vinegar
2-3 fresh oregano leaves
3-4 fresh basil leaves
big pinch of sugar
pinch of salt and black pepper
1/4 cup olive oil

Wash and dry your greens and mint leaves well. Thinly slice the mint leaves, and then mix them, the greens and the rest of the salad fixings together in a large bowl.

Toss all of the dressing ingredients {except the olive oil} in the food processor and pulse a couple of times. Add half the olive oil and process for about 10 seconds. Then add the other half and continue processing until it’s a consistency you like.

Pour the dressing over the salad fixings and toss well. Enjoy!

Mama’s Chicken Burritos

My mom will be the first to tell you that she doesn’t enjoy cooking. That’s not to say she’s not good at it–quite the contrary, but she doesn’t enjoy trying out new recipes and coming up with new combos in the kitchen. Being the working mom she was, she tended to go for the tried and true recipes that she knew we loved. This is one of those recipes.

Whenever I’d come home from college this would always be my first request. No one can make it quite like Mama, right? So, in honor of their visit, I’m sharing her famous chicken burrito recipe. It’s been altered slightly to eliminate some of the processed ingredients {like taco seasoning}. I usually make my own refried beans and salsa too, but the stuff from the jar is just as good. Promise.

Kiwi+Peach: Mama's Chicken Burritos

Mama’s Chicken Burritos

The Chicken
1 tsp chili powder
½ tsp chili flakes
½ tsp cayenne pepper
1 tsp oregano
1 tsp salt
3 tbsp olive oil
1 chicken breast, cubed

The Goods
½ of a red pepper, sliced
½ of an onion, sliced
1 tsp chili powder
½ can of refried beans
¼ cup sour cream

The Wrap
2 whole wheat tortillas
1 ball of fresh buffalo mozzarella
2 tbsp{ish} salsa

To make a marinade for the chicken, mix the spices together with the oil. Add the chicken and let sit for at least 30 minutes.

Begin heating a sauté pan. Slice the pepper and the onion and add to the pan. Dust with a bit of chili powder and give it a stir. Cover and let them cook, stirring occasionally, for 7-8 minutes or until the onion is translucent and soft.

Add the chicken (marinade and all) to the pan and cook until the chicken is done {5-7 minutes}.

While the chicken is cooking, warm the tortillas in the microwave for about 30 seconds. Then give the refried beans a hit for about 45 seconds. Spread the beans on the tortillas and then top with sour cream. When the peppers, onions, and chicken are finished, layer them on and wrap it up.

Slice the mozzarella and lay the cheese on top. Pop it in the micro to melt the cheese. It takes me about a minute and 45 seconds. Spoon some salsa on top and dig in!

Greek CousCous with Zucchini

What are your feelings about meatless meals?

I love them. In fact, some of my favorites {see Lauren’s Summer Favourite and Avocado Pasta} contain no meat at all. Give me a plate of veggies and grains over a slab of pork any day.

However, I live with a carnivore. While he has adjusted to only having meat with his dinner a few times a week, I am careful, when planning a meatless meal, to make sure that what I’m making will have the same staying power as meat.

While deceptively light, this incredibly versatile Greek CousCous packs a punch with its feta and walnuts in terms of staying power, and it’s a great week night meal because you can knock it out in less than 20 minutes. It’s also yummy cold, so it can be perfect for lunch the next day. If you absolutely must have meat, I bet it would be absolutely delicious with a side of lamb!

Kiwi+Peach: Greek CousCous with Zucchini

Greek CousCous with Zucchini

{adapted for two from The Fit Cook}

The Veg
1 tsp olive oil
½ of a zucchini, sliced and quartered
½ tsp cumin

The Grain
½ cup boiling water
½ cup cous cous
½ tsp thyme
1 tsp oregano
1 tsp garlic salt
black pepper
2 tsp olive oil

The Goodies
¼ cup freshly shelled walnuts, chopped
2 ounces {50 grams} feta cheese, cubed
1/2 of a lemon

Heat the olive oil in small skillet. While that’s heating up, slice and quarter your zucchini. When the pan is nice and hot, throw the zucchini in there, sprinkle some cumin over it, and give it a stir.

Boil your jug {or for us Americans, bring your water to a boil in a small pot}. In a small pot, combine cous cous, thyme, oregano, salt and pepper, and olive oil. Make sure the olive oil it mixed in well and add your boiling water. {If you’re boiling your water in said pot, then mix your cous cous and spices in a separate bowl and add it to the boiling water. OR you could go buy a jug. Trust me—they make like so much easier!} Cover and let sit for 5 minutes.

Give the zucchini another stir and then get to cracking your walnuts. {insert “that’s what she said” joke here} By the time you get finished shelling the nuts, the cous cous should be finished. Take a fork and fluff the cous cous.

The zucchini will need about 10 minutes to get appropriately soft. When it’s finished, add it, the walnuts, and feta to the cous cous and squeeze a bit of lemon juice on the top. Toss well and serve it up!